Monthly Archives: September 2013

Movie Reviews: Warm Bodies

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A surprisingly touching and tender movie, despite it’s loose horror theme, Warm Bodies is an unexpected gem of a rom-com.
The special effects in all but a few scenes are realistic enough, and the makeup is fantastic, but the real driving force behind this delightful movie is the actors. Nicholas Hoult is stellar as the love-struck zombie, R, and almost impossible to look away from. The way his face fills with all the hope and fear and love and vulnerability R feels without ever betraying his undead characteristics or saying more than a few words at a time is amazing to watch. Teresa Palmer is also excellent as Julie, the object of R’s affections and Rob Corddry and Analeigh Tipton (M and Nora, respectively)’s few lines are some of the movie’s best.
While I had hoped for a bit more comedy, as this is classified as one, I was still endlessly entertained and thrilled by Warm Bodies, and blown away again and again by Hoult’s performance.

Star4

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Book Reviews: Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins

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Undoubtedly the sweetest book I have read this and possibly any year, this narrative is one of love and friendship and family, all neatly wrapped up with some sharp witticism thrown in.
At its heart this is a simple yet deliciously tingly romance, but readers will also find passion, humour, and perhaps even a few tears within its pages.
Anna’s story is a richly woven one, and is sure to please fans of romances of all kinds. The setting, the food, the characters – all is magical and adorable and perfect.
This is exactly the kind of romance teen literature needs more of. It’s dramatic but not overdone, and charming and funny and silly and healthy, which many teen novels seem to lack nowadays. There is no co-dependent, angsty girls here, clinging onto the guys they like with all their might. There is just simple, beautiful connection, which is how life and love should be, and is ultimately the greatest theme within this novel – the connections we form with other people, for better or worse.
Recommended for ages 14+. Contains sexual references, coarse language and moderate themes.
Star4.5

View this book on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6936382-anna-and-the-french-kiss?ac=1

Book Playlist #1

Music and books are often bound together perfectly – songs can inspire the writing of novels and vice versa.
So here is a list of songs (with links) and books which I think match each other well, hope you enjoy!

Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green – To Whom it May Concern by The Civil Wars

Mockingjay (The Hunger Games #3) by Suzanne Collins – No Light, No Light by Florence + the Machine

Vampire Academy by Richelle Mead – Better Than Revenge by Taylor Swift
(bear with me, sceptics, the lyrics of the song match the Rose/Lissa/Mia situation perfectly)

Crossed (Matched #2) by Ally Condie – And Run by He Is We


Runaway (Airhead #3) by Mag Cabot
– Superhero by Cher Lloyd

Hope you like my first book playlist, feel free to comment suggestions for songs and books which I can use in another list!

Book Reviews: Hold Still by Nina LaCour

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This book was good, but it could have been much, much more. What was meant to be a story of grief and loss felt underdeveloped and slightly unrealistic, relationships between characters were often confusing and it didn’t seem like the behaviour of the teenaged characters was quite right. The boys populating the story seemed more like the fantasies of what girls want them to be like – openly sensitive and vulnerable in a way that I have never heard of guys acting. I have also never heard a guy say “he’s my best friend” about someone, yet they say it frequently in this story.
Despite its flaws, this was not a bad book. It had its good parts and many of the characters were interesting, it just was not as deep or powerful or thought-provoking as it could have been. The way the characters deal with their grief, while probably in line with real-life reactions, didn’t strike any chords with me as a reader. All I could glean from it was that if I lost my friend, I would have no amazing carpentry or photography skills to fall back on.
All in all this felt more like a Looking For Alaska by way of Paper Towns attempt, with a little bit of Thirteen Reasons Why thrown in but it never reaches the emotion or poignancy of John Green or Jay Asher’s work. Somehow, though, I still found things to enjoy about this book. It’s worth checking out if only for the awesome cubby-house ideas. Recommended for ages 15-18. Contains coarse language, mature themes and sexual references.
Star3
View this book on Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6373717-hold-still?ac=1
View all current information on the movie adaptation: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2334536/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1